Phil Perkins Photography

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Tag: Lower Lynn Camp Falls

  • Waterfall in Tremont

    Here’s another photograph of Upper Lynn Camp Falls, taken yesterday in the Tremont section of the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. It’s a scenic, two-tiered waterfall with easy access, located only 1/2 mile from the parking area. For another view, you can see the picture posted yesterday. Prints available:

    Thanks for stopping by!


  • Upper Lynn Camp Falls

    Located along the Middle Prong Trail in the Tremont section of the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, Upper Lynn Camp Falls is one of my favorite waterfalls to visit. On days like today, when the water is relatively low, one can walk to the end of this rock wall, which drops 35-feet to the right (a.k.a., Lower Lynn Camp Falls).

    If you might be interested in a fine print for your home, office, business lobby, hospital or cafeteria setting – or, to give as a gift – you can visit the following galleries to make a selection from several options available:

    Thanks very much!


  • Lynn Camp Falls

    Lynn Camp Falls

    Actually, this is the 35-foot Lower Lynn Camp Falls and the lower aspect of Upper Lynn Camp Falls. So, let’s just say Lynn Camp Falls. Whatever you chose to call it, it’s a very scenic and easily accessed waterfall, only 1/2 mile from parking. Located in the Smoky Mountains, it would also look wonderful on a wall in your home, office, business lobby, hospital or cafeteria setting. You can visit my gallery for more!


  • Trip To Tremont

    I recently visited the Tremont section of the Smoky Mountains, in Tennessee, featuring Lynn Camp Falls. It’s an easy hike of approximately one mile out and back, during which time I saw two horses and had a conversation with a bear.

    The upper portion stands 20-feet tall, consisting of two levels, sending water crashing into the broad side of a gigantic slab of rock. Water is forced to the side, then sent 35-feet down the lower falls.

    Conversation with a Bear

    Well, actually a bear cub (probably a 2nd-year cub, noticeably larger than the three climbing bears I’d seen previously), and I did all the talking, haha. I was driving slowly on a gravel road with my window open soon before sunrise, when I saw a black bear cub on the edge of the road. I stopped 8-feet away, and began talking to the bear in a friendly tone – as if to a child, or unfamiliar dog with questions. The bear stepped back only 4-feet, putting a minor branch between us, and remained in place for approx. 15-seconds…not long, but enough time to make a memory.

    The area is one of the gems in the Smoky Mountains!


  • Black And White Waterfall

    Black And White Waterfall

    Water turns the corner and crashes down a rock-face located at Lower Lynn Camp Falls. This black and white photograph was taken in the Tremont section of the Smoky Mountains, in Tennessee. Prints available at Pixels & ArtFlakes. Thanks for stopping by!


  • Lynn Camp Falls

    Lynn Camp Falls

    Photographed while hiking along Middle Prong Trail in the Tremont section of the Smoky Mountains, in Tennessee, this is Lynn Camp Falls – primarily the upper section. Prints are available in my shop. If interested, there are many print types to select, and customization options allow you to make it your own! Hope to see you soon…


  • Lower Lynn Camp Falls

    Lower Lynn Camp Falls

    Located along the Middle Prong Trail in the Tremont section of the Smoky Mountains, in Tennessee, the 35-foot Lower Lynn Camp Falls is an easy 1/2 mile hike which parallels Lynn Camp Prong.

    Turning on Tremont Road, the Great Smoky Mountains Institute at Tremont is 2.2 miles, left at the stop sign. It has a restroom and a small gift shop (maps, t-shirts, hats, etc.). This is where you would park if hiking to Spruce Flats Falls. Continue another 3.1 miles along a gravel road to reach the trailhead.

    The Middle Prong Trail was originally a railroad bed used by the Little River Railroad & Lumber Company, based in Townsend, Tennessee, which was one of the largest commercial logging operations in southern Appalachia, in operation for 38 years until 1939, with 150 miles of railroad. Visitors can find more information available at the Little River Railroad Museum web site.

    Immediately after crossing the river on a footbridge, the trail forks – stay to the left to follow the river, and watch for horse droppings (equestrians allowed). Depending upon what you have planned for the day, you might consider hiking 4.1 miles on the same trail to visit Indian Flats Falls.

    Photography

    If you’d like to accent a wall in your home or office with a print featuring my photography, you can visit my gallery at Pixels to select the print type which best suits your interests.

    I hope that you’ve enjoyed your visit. Thanks for stopping by!


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