Tag: Cades Cove

  • Shots from the Trail

    Prints available of photographs from Twin Arches, Cades Cove and Cane Creek.


  • Black and White

    Photo One This is the Savage Gulf State Natural Area, located on the Cumberland Plateau in Tennessee – prints available.

    Photo Two This is an old wooden barn photographed while visiting Cades Cove in the Smoky Mountains – prints available.


  • Cades Cove

    Please visit my gallery for prints. These autumn photographs were taken at Cades Cove, an historical settlement of early European immigrants located in a verdant valley of the Smoky Mountains, in Tennessee. It’s a beautiful area and a print would make a wonderful gift. Thanks for visiting!


  • Vintage Cabin

    This photograph features the historical Elijah Oliver Place, which dates from 1866 and is located in Tennessee at Cades Cove, a verdant valley surrounded by the Smoky Mountains. You can find prints and more available in these shops: Pixels, Redbubble and ArtPal.

    Thanks for visiting!


  • Barn at Cades Cove

    I photographed this vintage barn on a recent visit to Cades Cove, while hiking to the Elijah Oliver Place, selecting a color photograph for the sunny outdoors and a black and white shot to coincide with the dark interior. You can see several prints available in my gallery. Thanks for visiting!


  • Colors of Cades Cove

    The colorful change of season to autumn is a wonderful time to get outdoors and enjoy the beauty of nature. These photographs were taken recently during my visit to Cades Cove, highlighting trails and landscape scenery. If interested, you can find great prints in my gallery. Thanks for visiting!


  • Cades Cove

    Cades Cove

    Here’s another view of Cades Cove, as photographed from my vehicle along the roadside. This historical region was home to early European settlers, and features several old churches, cabins and a grist mill. Visitors might also encounter bears, prevalent within this verdant valley, along the 11-mile (one way) scenic drive. You can find prints in my gallery, which make a great gift-giving idea, as well as an excellent accent piece for your home or office. Thanks for stopping by!


  • Shots from the Trail

    These photograph include: The Sinks, Cades Cove and Middle Prong Little River. You can find fine prints and many other products available in my gallery at Pixels.

    Thanks very much!


  • Cades Cove

    Cades Cove

    Here’s a photograph taken while on my recent visit to Cades Cove. It shows a southern view, facing away from the Smoky Mountains in the direction to which the peaks taper off.

    Bears are popular here, and I had the pleasure of seeing four cubs. One was in the woods near the road, and quickly ran deeper into the forest. The other three were high in a tree, barely visible as obscured by the foliage, though commanding the attention of a small crowd of 20 cars and passengers, below. Bears are very good climbers and one cub was at the top of the tree, approx. 60-feet in the air, causing the tree to sway quite a bit.

    You can see more in my gallery – thanks!


  • Shots from the Trail

    Yesterday, I visited the Tremont section of the Smoky Mountains and hiked along Middle Prong Little River. Afterwards, I enjoyed the 11-mile scenic loop drive through nearby Cades Cove. See more in my gallery.


  • Spruce Flats Falls

    Prints available. Here’s a distant view of Spruce Flats Falls. It’s a lovely 30′ tall waterfall located in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, and can be enjoyed while hiking a moderately difficult 2 mile out and back trail. Plus, you can discover many fine prints (and more) featuring my photography when you visit my gallery…hope to see you soon!


  • Spruce Flats Falls

    After sitting a spell to enjoy a peaceful setting at the base of Spruce Flats Falls, I decided to hike downstream to see what I could find. During summer months, the water is generally lower than otherwise, allowing one to more easily traverse the rock-lined waterway of Spruce Flats Branch. Nevertheless, there are several areas which remain difficult to safely navigate, and it’s important to be mindful of potential hazards.

    Of course, damp rocks are slippery, as is moss (which is everywhere), and each should be approached with caution. Worse yet, though, are rocks which appear dry yet have a thin, slippery film under a fine layer of dirt. Other rocks, some of significant size and weight, defy ones perception of stability, unexpectedly shifting underfoot, posing a risk of falling or injuring an ankle. The same holds true for downed timber. It’s important to always test whether or not a log can support ones weight, if that is the purpose applied for passage. Again, even the largest log can give way and pose real danger.

    At a few points, I had to climb up and out of the creek bed, making my way across steep and narrow surfaces, before descending again back to the water below. In such situations, trekking poles are critical and serve to provide needed support for both weight and balance. It’s also wise to be aware of surrounding handholds (hearty plants, small trees or exposed roots) on hillsides, should the need exist.

    The final stretch of this creekside adventure entailed descending a 15-foot rock face, strewn with logs and quite slippery in some areas. This waterfall is named Honey Cove Falls, and is visible from along a dirt road in Tremont, across Middle Prong Little River. Following consumption of water and a protein bar, I relaxed to enjoy the natural beauty of this area, thereafter pondering… what next? Do I retrace my steps up the mountain to Spruce Flats Falls, expending a great deal of time and energy in so doing, such that I may then hike out along the trail from which I entered the forest? Or, given a seasonal deficiency of water, is it possible to safely wade across Middle Prong Little River, in order to follow the road back to my parked vehicle?

    I opted for the latter, very cautiously wading through over 2-feet deep flowing water, across a river bed of very slippery stones. Even here, caution is critical to avoid injury, as ones feet can slip and become wedged between rocks.

    All told, I had a great hike and enjoyed many sights which are not often seen. Being mindful and with a deep respect of the danger inherent in nature, such hikes aren’t overly difficult. However, without deliberation, it can be very easy to have a bad day.

    I have many fine prints available in my gallery, and encourage guests to visit.


  • Spruce Flats Falls

    Standing 30-feet tall, Spruce Flats Falls can be enjoyed on a moderately difficult two mile out and back hike in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee. And, you can enjoy this waterfall scenery in your home on a print, as well, when you visit any of the following galleries: Pixels, Society 6 and ArtPal.


    Here’s another view of the waterfall, photographed while standing on rocks in the middle of Spruce Flats Branch. The water-level was low during my visit, so I was able to fully explore downstream…more on that another time. You can find prints in my galleries at Pixels, ArtPal and Redbubble.


    This photograph was taken from the left side of the falls, closer to the plunge pool area. It’s somewhat obscured from within the foliage, yet a beautiful natural scene nonetheless. For prints, gifts and apparel, please visit these galleries: Pixels, Redbubble and ArtPal.

    Thanks for stopping by!


  • Return to Autumn

    This seasonal splash of color was photographed last autumn while visiting Cades Cove in the Smoky Mountains of Tennessee, near Townsend.

    You can enjoy it all year long – in your home or office – on fine prints and other items, when you visit these galleries: Pixels, ArtPal, and Redbubble.

    Thanks for stopping by!


  • Black and White Cabin

    Black and White Cabin

    Located in the Smoky Mountains at Cades Cove, not far from Townsend, Tennessee, this black and white photograph features a vintage cabin built by European settlers in the early eighteen-hundreds. Many prints are available in my gallery. Thanks for stopping by!